Barber and Early speak at CU's Baptist Heritage Lecture Series

Barber and Early speak at CU's Baptist Heritage Lecture Series

April 1, 2014
For Immediate Release


 

Dr. Bart Barber, left, pastor of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas, and Dr. Joe Early Jr., assistant professor of theology in the School of Theology, answer questions from the audience at the annual Baptist Heritage Lecture Series in the Campbellsville University Banquet Hall. (Campbellsville University Photo by Hanna Hall)


By Hanna Hall, student news writer

 

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. – Dr. Bart Barber, pastor of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas, and Dr. Joe Early Jr., assistant professor of theology in the School of Theology, discussed Landmarkism during Campbellsville University’s recent Baptist Heritage Lecture Series and chapel.

Barber presented his paper titled, “Who Moved My Old Landmark? Changing Definitions of Landmarkism in the Early Twentieth Century.”

He began with some background information over the foundation of early Baptism. He said Landmarkism in the American South caused southern Baptists to split into multiple denominations. He said this is where the confusion on the true definition of Landmarkism began.

Barber discussed how “Nashville is the center of Baptist life today.” He brought his presentation to an end with an overall understanding of the orientation of Landmarkism.

Early followed Barber with his discussion of “The Unofficial Beginning of Landmarkism: The Cotton Grove Resolutions.”

Early said, “No two have ever defined Landmarkism the same.” He continued by defining what Landmarkism meant to him and some history behind its development.

He spent a large portion of his paper talking about the importance of James Robinson Graves who was an editor of the Tennessee Baptist newspaper and went on to become the founder and champion of the Landmarkers.
In conclusion, Early expressed the significance of the Cotton Grove Church and how “nothing of the original Cotton Grove Church remains today.”

The Baptist Heritage Lecture Series began with welcoming remarks and introductions by Dr. Dwayne Howell, professor of Old Testament and Hebrew; Dr. John E. Chowning, vice president for church and external relations and executive assistant to the president, and Dr. Twyla Hernandez, assistant professor of Christian missions.
Dr. Glen Taul, the university’s archivist, delivered the benediction.

Campbellsville University is a widely acclaimed Kentucky-based Christian university with more than 3,600 students offering 63 undergraduate options, 17 master’s degrees, five postgraduate areas and eight pre-professional programs. The website for complete information is campbellsville.edu.

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