Shawn Williams

Dr. Shawn H. Williams, Associate Professor of Political Science

Shawn WilliamsB.A. Lees-McRae College
M.A. Angelo State University
Ph.D. University of Texas at Dallas

Dr. Williams is the lead professor for the political science program and the advisor to the CU chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2010. His doctoral dissertation examined the weakness of using rational choice approaches to collective decision making in American and eastern European political parties, as well as in decision making on the U.S. Supreme Court. His current work focuses on electoral decision making and authentic learning

Email: shwilliams@campbellsville.edu
Phone: (270) 789-5264
Office: Druien Hall 223


Fall 2014 Course Information

Office Hours:  M 1:30pm-2:30pm; WF 9am-10am, 1:30pm-2:30pm; TR 1:30pm-3:00pm

POL 341: Comparative Governments
TTC 105
9:30am - 10:45am TR

The objective of this course is to assist the student in developing their knowledge of, and appreciation for, the complexity of politics around the world. It will examine many of the key concepts important to comparing nations, as well as how changes in the world may change or threaten both states and the state concept. The student will be responsible for understanding the basic components of political systems, how these interact, and how they are evolving. Finally, students will be expected to learn specific knowledge about the political systems of some of the most important countries in the world.

The course uses two textbooks, supplemented by a series of instructor-prepared YouTube videos designed to replace parts of lecture.

POL 451: Political Parties
TTC 105
11:00am - 11:50am MWF

The objective of this course is to assist the student in understanding the nature of political parties and their relationship to both political elites and the public. The course will approach the topic from a comparative perspective, but will use the American party system as a case study.

This course will be using an authentic, collaborative learning model.  In addition to exams, the class will require students to demonstrate their mastery of key concepts by developing a third political party.  Students will determine the key ideological and platform positions on important issues of the day, develop campaign materials, and build a course website to promote the party and its agenda.  The course website is an ongoing work product that will begin to take shape in late September/early October.  It can be found here.

POL 462: Western Political Philosophy
ED 127
11:00am - 12:15am TR

The objective of this course is to assist the student in developing their knowledge of, and appreciation for, the complexity of politics around the world. It will examine many of the key concepts important to comparing nations, as well as how changes in the world may change or threaten both states and the state concept. The student will be responsible for understanding the basic components of political systems, how these interact, and how they are evolving. Finally, students will be expected to learn specific knowledge about the political systems of some of the most important countries in the world.

Most student work will be submitted via the course website, including a weekly blog where students will share their analysis on how political philosophy can help us to understand current issues, events, and debates.  The course website can be found here.